One of genius Albert Einstein’s final predictions, was dramatically proven last night after scientists revealed they had discovered evidence to support the existence of Gravitational Waves, and with it the ability to explain in greater depth how the universe was created.

Scientists announced that they were able to view ripples in the fabric of space-time, and therefore reinforce Einstein’s prediction that if enough energy is created, it can cause a ripple in the fabric of time itself.

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Scientists observing two colliding black holes, one slightly bigger than the other, learned that after both stars collapsed and subsequent black holes were created, they began to be drawn toward each other, encompassing each other like rival cowboys in the old west, ready to duke it out. Circling at half the speed of light up until they merged as one. Releasing energy unlike anything scientists had ever witnessed before.

Even more spectacular, scientists were witnessing an event that had taken place more than 1.3 billion years ago. The scientists from Washington Hanford and Louisiana Livingston were effectively watching an incident that had occurred more than a quarter of the entire time the earth had existed in the entire universe.

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Both black holes at the precise moment of mergence released 50 times more energy than the whole of the universe emitted in light, radio waves, X-rays and gamma rays combined.

Almost beyond the limits of comprehension, In 2015, a tiny planet in the far reaches of another solar system, contained a species whom little more than a century before hadn’t even developed aeronautical flight. Had the capability to read the 1.3 billion year old signal.

The force of the energy released by the clashing black holes was so powerful it actually managed to distort spacetime, and this distortion travelled 1.3 billion years across the known universe.

It was 1916 that Albert Einstein first surmised the possibility of gravitational waves in his theory of relativity, but for 50 years scientists were no closer to proving it. Ronald Drever, a scientist from the University of Glasgow, was integral in the creation of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), alongside Co Creator, Kip Thorne they dedicated their entire career to proving Einstein’s Theory of Relativity, and thanks to this device they proved it.

Scientists are expected to declare they have detected gravitational waves, which would support a prediction essential to Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity.

Thorne said that without Drever’s creative genius LIGO wouldn’t exist, speaking to the Guardian he also said “The colliding black holes that produced these gravitational waves created a violent storm in the fabric of space and time, a storm in which time speeded up and slowed down, and speeded up again, a storm in which the shape of space was bent in this way and that way.”

The discovery is not only the proof of gravitational waves and their effect, but gives direct evidence that black holes exist and with it unlock the ability to research black holes and what happens when they collide.

David Reitze LIGO executive director explained the significance of the discovery at the press conference; “This was a truly scientific moonshot, and we did it, we landed on the moon.”

Researchers using LIGO were able to prove that as a direct result of two black holes colliding 1.3 billion years ago, the earth in our present day, actually expanded and contracted by 1/100,000 of a nanometer.

Ligo team member Szabolcs Marka, of Columbia University said “There are people who’ve put their entire life into this search, and there are people who died before having a chance to see anything. It’s really a wonderful feeling that you have validated the investment of the tremendous amount of work. And it’s not just that you found something, but you gave something to everybody, to the rest of the human race.”

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